Hacked By XwoLfTn

Myanmar is a beautiful country of 55 million people, bordered by India, China and Thailand. It had a strict military government for years but is gradually moving toward a more open and free society. Continue reading

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Travel Tales for Sunday, November 27, 2011

When I left Havana with my group to visit Hemingway’s house in Cojimar, I didn’t expect to see acres upon acres of sugarcane fields with very few homes or villages until we reached the cities of Santa Clara, home to 250,000 people, then Cienfuegos with a population of 175,000 and finally Tri… Continue reading

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Travel Tales for Sunday, November 20, 2011

For many years, I have wanted to visit Cuba but with the U.S. embargo, there was never a possibility until a few months ago when my Cuban guide was able to get a People to People license for my professional group. Continue reading

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Portico Di Romagna: a perfect place for a restful respite

Looking for a peaceful place in Italy, far from tourism, noise and traffic? Try Portico Di Romagna; population: 400 people. Continue reading

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New Zealand: no rush, no limit

Where can you celebrate a 70th birthday when you have limited time, limited budget and limited physical abilities? My husband and I chose New Zealand, a country as green as Kaua‘i with lush tropical forests and more sheep than we can count. Continue reading

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Southeast Asia part I : Laos

Several months ago, I prepared a photography trip to Southeast Asia but I hesitated to include Laos as an extension of the core trip to Cambodia and Vietnam. In retrospect doing so was a great choice. Laos is a country filled with friendly, gentle people, a Buddhist culture and spectacular scenery, all still years behind other countries in Southeast Asia in terms of development. In a way, we got a taste of what it was probably like in that part of the world many years ago. Continue reading

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Southeast Asia part II : Cambodia

After our time in Laos, my friends and I flew to Siem Reap, where the most famous of Cambodia’s Wats ( temples) is located: Angkor Wat. Our first impression was that it is very hot, very crowded and very dusty. But Angkor Wat makes it worth visiting. It is, above all else, a religious place where Hinduism, honoring the God Vishnu, was initially practiced until it was supplanted by Buddhism. Its highly stylized architecture is carved in sandstone and the walls are adorned with extensive bas- reliefs depicting episodes of Hindu battles. It is the most carved reliefs of any monument in the world. Continue reading

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Southeast Asia Part III: South and Central Vietnam

Leaving Cambodia, my friends and I reached Vietnam by boat from Phnom Penh via a picturesque four-hour ride on the Mekong River, passing fishing boats and farms along the riverside. Continue reading

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Hacked By Shade

After visiting the southern and central parts of Vietnam, my friends and I flew to Hanoi, Vietnam’s capital and second-largest city. Continue reading

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